Fulton County DA Fani Willis asks judge for protective order in 2020 election trial

Photo by Photo by Gage Skidmore on Flickr

 

Democrats keep escalating the lawfare against Donald Trump.

This time it’s bad news.

Fani Willis hit Donald Trump with one courtroom surprise that will leave you red with rage.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis keeps tipping her hand that her RICO indictment against Donald Trump over Trump contesting the 2020 election is a political hit job.

The latest evidence came when Willis filed for an emergency protective order with Judge Scott McAfee after ABC News got their hands on video footage of the proffer sessions from Trump lawyers Jenna Ellis, Ken Chesebro and Sidney Powell after they pleaded guilty to minor charges unrelated to the election conspiracy Willis alleged took place.

Without presenting any evidence Willis claimed Trump’s legal team leaked the videos to intimidate potential witnesses.

“These confidential video recordings were not released by the State to any party other than the defendants charged in the indictment, pursuant to the discovery process as required by law. The release of these confidential video recordings is clearly intended to intimidate witnesses in this case, subjecting them to harassment and threats prior to trial, constitutes indirect communication about the facts of this case with codefendants and witnesses, and obstructs the administration of justice, in violation of the conditions of release imposed on each defendant,” Willis argued.

Far from damning for Trump, the videos completely debunked Willis’s entire case.

Powell told prosecutors that she believed Trump listened to her as opposed to other lawyers because Trump truly believed he won the 2020 election.

“All his instincts told him he had been defrauded, that the election was a big fraud,” Powell told prosecutors. “Just general instincts that something wasn’t right here.”

“Because I didn’t think he had lost,” Powell added, “I saw an avenue pursuant to which, if I was right, he would remain president.”

Powell also said she never heard Trump say he lost the election.

Trump plans to present an advice-of-counsel defense and tell jurors he followed the advice of lawyers in contesting the election based on the good-faith belief he won the election.

ABC News contributor and former Georgia prosecutor Chris Timmons told the network this testimony bolstered Trump’s defense and would work well for him in court.

“That information would be helpful for the defense in that it bolsters a defense that the former president thought he was acting lawfully,” Timmons stated.

Even the one big “bombshell” was a massive dud.

Trump lawyer Jenna Ellis claimed deputy chief of staff Dan Scavino told her at a Christmas party that Trump wouldn’t leave the White House under any circumstances.

“And he said to me, in a kind of excited tone, ‘Well, we don’t care, and we’re not going to leave,’” Ellis stated. “And I said, ‘What do you mean?’ And he said ‘Well, the boss’, meaning President Trump — and everyone understood ‘the boss,’ that’s what we all called him — he said, ‘The boss is not going to leave under any circumstances. We are just going to stay in power.’”

But Willis will run into two problems if she wants to present this as evidence against Trump.

The first is that Trump left the White House on January 20, 2021, in accordance with the Constitution.

Second, Ellis never heard this from Trump which makes it hearsay testimony which would be inadmissible in court.

Willis’s case was trouble from the start.

The Fulton County district attorney based her indictment on a Frankenstein monster legal theory that criminalized free speech, petitioning the government and following the advice of lawyers.

Then it became clear Willis couldn’t back up her charges because all the plea deals she racked up never contained an admission of guilt on the underlying alleged conspiracy to overturn the 2020 election.

Now Willis is afraid the American people will see that the “evidence” Willis has in her possession exonerates Trump.